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As we prepare for Joe Biden to assume the presidency

Joe Biden becomes America’s 46th president of the United States on Wednesday. For millions of Americans (and millions more from nations around the world), this will be the equivalent of opening the windows and undertaking the much-needed spring cleaning.

I’ve made no secret I detest the current president; his conduct and many of his policies reveal an absence of character and goodness. The man is corrupt, and I won’t miss him.

But forgive me for not jumping on the Party Train that some people believe is associated with a Biden presidency.

Biden is a good man, one for whom words such as “empathetic” and “kind” apply. But there is no reason to believe that robust change will come during his years in office.

Oh, sure, Biden might throw a bone or two to the hard left in order to ensure they remain muted in their criticism of him. But to anticipate a vision for what America can be in the 21st century, and then acting on it, is just not there. And that vision, by the way, is not owned by the aforementioned hard left.

I accept the pandemic will cut into what Biden might be able to accomplish. But a massive economic proposal to give Americans more stability in the short term is not a vision. It’s a necessity.

Biden will not attack the entrenched problems that damage the country: economic inequity, community degradation, insufficient infrastructure, failing schools, corporate dominance of every sector, inadequate health care, the lust for hegemony, and more. This is a man who has spent close to 50 years inside the Washington bubble, one in which money talks and the powerless are left outside in the cold, forced to look in through the windows to see the opulence and abundance inside.

A stronger America is one in which people matter over profit; allegiance to country is real, not faked; family-first policies are considered normal, not radical; community need is more important than corporate greed; faith is celebrated, not reviled; the education system graduates students with requisite hard and soft skills; pride in the homeland matters; power is used for honor, not hegemony; small businesses flourish; roads, rails and airplanes operate at peak performance; allies are, in fact, in our corner; veterans are respected; and integrity and character mean something.

It’s doubtful any man or woman seeking the presidency will do what it takes to, dare I say, make America great, but I’m confident Biden won’t.

Biden will be an improvement over the wannabe dictator he will replace. But he’s more likely to return America to an inadequate normal than anything else.

This post echoes louder and louder: Now that Trump cannot help you, you abandon him? How weak.

Bobby Knight is the greatest thing to ever happen to the Indiana University men’s basketball program. He set the Hoosiers on a trajectory that few men or women before or after him have matched at any other school across the university. Indiana basketball has been, at best, a second-tier national program since Knight was fired on Sept, 10, 2000.

He did it his way, and he apologized to no one.

Knight’s behavior was the worst kept secret in Bloomington, Indiana, the home of the university. But when Knight was winning 20+ games per year and positioning the Hoosiers into the national championship discussion, his sins were swept under the rug.

Eventually, the wins started to decline and the aspirations for titles went away. Then, and only then, was Knight kicked to the curb. The president of the university claimed that Knight’s behavior had become too much to accept, and he had to go.

What baloney.

Knight was a useful pawn when he was winning games and championships. He no longer was when his teams stopped winning.

Understand, I’m not defending the way Knight treated people. What I’m asking you to realize is that Knight was cast aside only because he was no longer producing champions.

And that brings me to Donald Trump.

I’ve no interest in defending Trump, and I’ll be celebrating on Jan. 20 when Joe Biden becomes the next president of the United States. But I am disgusted by the number of people and organizations suddenly running away from Trump.

On Friday night, Twitter announced it was permanently shutting down Trump’s personal account on that platform. The language used to defend the decision seems all too similar to what was used on that September day in Indiana. The decision is empty; Trump was good for business, so to speak, throughout his run up to the 2016 election and beyond. Once that changed, Twitter suddenly did what it was not willing to do over the past 48 or so months.

Wrong.

Meanwhile, multiple Republican politicians are running away from the president in much the same way they would be if they were fleeing a burning building. Their public self-preservation and criticisms of Trump are vacuous. Many of these Republicans either remained silent about Trump over the past four years or they allied themselves with him. But now that he can do nothing for them, they claim to be fed up.

How weak.

If Knight really was that bad in the eyes of the university’s leaders, he should have been cast aside long before he was. If Trump really was that bad in the eyes of Republican officials (not to mention to Twitter), he should have been cast aside long before he was.

Blame Knight and Trump for their actions? Absolutely. Blame their enablers for not having a spine? Absolutely.

Now that Trump cannot help you, you abandon him? How weak.

Bobby Knight is the greatest thing to ever happen to the Indiana University men’s basketball program. He set the Hoosiers on a trajectory that few men or women before or after him have matched at any other school across the university. Indiana basketball has been, at best, a second-tier national program since Knight was fired on Sept, 10, 2000.

He did it his way, and he apologized to no one.

Knight’s behavior was the worst kept secret in Bloomington, Indiana, the home of the university. But when Knight was winning 20+ games per year and positioning the Hoosiers into the national championship discussion, his sins were swept under the rug.

Eventually, the wins started to decline and the aspirations for titles went away. Then, and only then, was Knight kicked to the curb. The president of the university claimed that Knight’s behavior had become too much to accept, and he had to go.

What baloney.

Knight was a useful pawn when he was winning games and championships. He no longer was when his teams stopped winning.

Understand, I’m not defending the way Knight treated people. What I’m asking you to realize is that Knight was cast aside only because he was no longer producing champions.

And that brings me to Donald Trump.

I’ve no interest in defending Trump, and I’ll be celebrating on Jan. 20 when Joe Biden becomes the next president of the United States. But I am disgusted by the number of people and organizations suddenly running away from Trump.

On Friday night, Twitter announced it was permanently shutting down Trump’s personal account on that platform. The language used to defend the decision seems all too similar to what was used on that September day in Indiana. The decision is empty; Trump was good for business, so to speak, throughout his run up to the 2016 election and beyond. Once that changed, Twitter suddenly did what it was not willing to do over the past 48 or so months.

Wrong.

Meanwhile, multiple Republican politicians are running away from the president in much the same way they would be if they were fleeing a burning building. Their public self-preservation and criticisms of Trump are vacuous. Many of these Republicans either remained silent about Trump over the past four years or they allied themselves with him. But now that he can do nothing for them, they claim to be fed up.

How weak.

If Knight really was that bad in the eyes of the university’s leaders, he should have been cast aside long before he was. If Trump really was that bad in the eyes of Republican officials (not to mention to Twitter), he should have been cast aside long before he was.

Blame Knight and Trump for their actions? Absolutely. Blame their enablers for not having a spine? Absolutely.

ICYMI: An open letter to those now ripping Trump

This post was written around 11:00 this morning. It certainly has taken on a more powerful meaning as the day unfolded.

An open letter to those of you now ripping Trump:

You spineless, weak and feckless people

Now you dare say Trump deserves criticism?

Now you find a voice to criticize him?

Now?

You stayed silent when he separated families, yet you insist you value family?

You stayed silent when he swelled the deficit, yet you insist you value fiscal responsibility?

You stayed silent when he mocked the weak, yet you insist you value character?

You enabled every conspiracy theory, every angry rant, every assault on our allies.

Your sins of acquiescence cannot be absolved by saying something now.

If he was your man in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020, then he is your man in 2021. Abandoning him now says much about the kind of person you are.

You loathe him now because he can do no more for you? Repulsive.

That is all.

Where are the real Americans?

Photo: Anthony Moretti 6Jan2018

Where are the real Americans right now?

Anyone who refuses to use his or her voice right now to condemn what is unfolding at the Capitol is complicit in it.

Anyone who will not say that the siege of the Capitol is sedition and a brutal violation of the law does not care about the law.

Anyone who continues to stand with a president of the United States who is responsible for what has happened in recent hours doesn’t care about democracy.

Republican Party leaders, today is on you. The stain of the violation of the Capitol partially was brought on by your refusal to stand up to Donald Trump.

Perhaps you will reflect on what you’ve done and seeking true forgiveness. Or perhaps you are so empty of morals that you won’t.

And that applies to anyone who won’t speak up now.