Category Archives: economics

Where Trump blew it

In two weeks, Americans should make clear they want Joe Biden to be the next president of the United States. Of course, polling numbers can change, and we certainly know they can be wrong, but the lead that Biden has over Donald Trump continues.

If Biden wins, he’ll have pulled off a surprise: Incumbent presidents aren’t supposed to lose when Americans believe the economy is moving in the right direction. In 2020 they’re indicating they believe it is and voters also say Trump would be better than Biden at handling economic issues.

Despite that optimism, you can find plenty of voters who say they’re doing well financially, but they’re not interested in returning Trump to the White House. The Boston Globe reported one such story this week.

So, where did it go wrong for Trump? The reasons are obvious: his awful handling of the coronavirus pandemic; numerous suggestions he’s at best prejudiced and at worst racist; neutering America’s image around the world; picking losing battles with China on tariffs, and the list can go on from there.

An argument for a second Trump term is a difficult one to make, and such a case is built around a flimsy idea that Democrats are eager to create a socialist utopia in the United States.

Serious followers of politics know Biden is no socialist. Sure, in comparison to Trump’s agenda, Biden’s policies are progressive. However, whenever one leader takes the country as far off the rails as Trump has done, his successor must immediately steer toward something resembling normal.

That should be Biden’s task beginning on the afternoon of Jan. 20, 2021.

Small business owners in Los Angeles lurch toward an uncertain future

Many of you reading this blog know I lived in Southern California for almost 20 years. And those were my formative years, including high school (St. Francis, 1985) and college (USC, 1989).

When I left in 1995, it was because the cost of living and the quality of life I wanted no longer seemed within my reach. Mind you, I was in my late 20s and single, and I wanted to get my Master’s elsewhere; however, who knew what that planned one year in Ohio had in store!

Nevertheless, a part of me will always call Los Angeles home. And a story in today’s Los Angeles Times hit me hard because many people who are in my age bracket and who stayed there face a precarious future because of the economic fallout from coronavirus. As one person said,

“Sometimes you get caught up in what I call sweeps of history, and it doesn’t make any difference how smart you are or how strong or well-financed … You can be swept away by a tidal wave. We’re in a pandemic and it’s a tsunami.”

Yes, I know small business owners in all parts of the country are under threat because of coronavirus, the convenience of e-commerce and the cost of doing business (to name just three), but reading about them in a place where I called home — and where part of me always will be found — was an important reminder that they are the backbone of every community and city.

Take them away and you’re left with lots of closed doors, unemployed people and a decline in the character of the place you call home. Los Angeles likely will never be home again, but I still love it, and, oh, it has such rich character.

Small business owners in Los Angeles lurch toward an uncertain future

Many of you reading this blog know I lived in Southern California for almost 20 years. And those were my formative years, including high school (St. Francis, 1985) and college (USC, 1989).

When I left in 1995, it was because the cost of living and the quality of life I wanted no longer seemed within my reach. Mind you, I was in my late 20s and single, and I wanted to get my Master’s elsewhere; however, who knew what that planned one year in Ohio had in store!

Nevertheless, a part of me will always call Los Angeles home. And a story in today’s Los Angeles Times hit me hard because many people who are in my age bracket and who stayed there face a precarious future because of the economic fallout from coronavirus. As one person said,

“Sometimes you get caught up in what I call sweeps of history, and it doesn’t make any difference how smart you are or how strong or well-financed … You can be swept away by a tidal wave. We’re in a pandemic and it’s a tsunami.”

Yes, I know small business owners in all parts of the country are under threat because of coronavirus, the convenience of e-commerce and the cost of doing business (to name just three), but reading about them in a place where I called home — and where part of me always will be found — was an important reminder that they are the backbone of every community and city.

Take them away and you’re left with lots of closed doors, unemployed people and a decline in the character of the place you call home. Los Angeles likely will never be home again, but I still love it, and, oh, it has such rich character.