The Blamers, the Innocent and the Arrogant have spoken: Give me freedom (and a heaping helping of coronavirus)

Throw in the towel.

We who have preached for the last six or so weeks that staying at home is the right thing to do in the fight against coronavirus are losing the battle. After staying home the six weeks prior, more and more Americans have made it clear over the past month and a half that they’re going to live their lives, and many are doing so with zero care for their neighbors, their co-workers and their families.

Congratulations on your choice as to how to live your life. But do know that you’re paying with a credit card and the bill is already starting to come due.

We who preached caution are losing to three groups of people, all of whom have considerably large numbers.

The first group is the Blamers. The statement that best sums up the people in this group: “It’s your own damn fault if you catch coronavirus.” This crowd won’t listen to any stay-at-home argument because they’ve convinced themselves that people who catch coronavirus are either sloppy or dirty. “If only they’d wash their hands more often” is a statement the Blamers will make, even though they aren’t the best hygienic experts. They’re also not especially knowledgeable about how to contract coronavirus (but don’t tell them that).

The second group is the Innocent. The statement that best sums up this crowd: “We can’t stay locked up forever.” Six weeks was simply too long to put society over self. The Innocent need their vacations, their salon, their shopping, their parties, their spa and their people. “I can’t believe I had to go without so much for so long” is a statement this group will make. Don’t remind them just how few six weeks is in the sum total of their lives because they’re too busy blissfully planning their next outing.

The final group is the Arrogant. “I’ll do what I damn well please because I live in America” are words you might hear people in this crowd say. These are the people who barrel into a supermarket or other store with no mask on and then dare someone to stop them. These are the people who think the mask-wearing crowd are wimps. These are the people for whom, thanks be to God, the world revolves around. “I know my rights” are words you might hear from this crowd. Just don’t ask them what those rights are, of course.

The steady increase in coronavirus cases over the past few weeks tells the story. The Blamers, the Innocent and the Arrogant (BIA) are everywhere these days. They’ve surrounded the people who also are trying to enjoy some semblance of a normal life but doing so carefully. They BIAers are winning. For now..

Some governors already saying enough is enough. At least one other governor is staring a potential catastrophe in the face. At least one other governor appears to be in denial about catastrophe.

The Blamers, the Innocent and the Arrogant had better be ready for the full brunt of the bill being run up by their stupidity. If the situation doesn’t change soon, the fall will be lots of fun.

UCONN PRESIDENT: ACADEMIC, ATHLETICS CUTS ALMOST CERTAIN

The Hartford Courant reports the president of the University of Connecticut delivered a sobering message to the institution’s Board of Trustees about the financial health of the university.

The proposed budget for the 2021 fiscal year, which projects a budget deficit of between $47 million and $129 million, recommends drastic measures to address the university’s staggering revenue losses. UConn’s athletic program faces a 25% subsidy reduction, academic programs with low enrollment could be reduced or eliminated and furloughs and layoffs could be a possibility.

Another report from the Hartford Courant made another point clear: UConn’s abysmal football program isn’t being touched.

UConn’s FBS football program has had a long string of losing seasons and falling attendance, however the school did not consider dropping it, or moving it to less expensive FCS status. Now operating as an independent, the program will cut travel costs, and play “guarantee games” which bring $1.5-$2 million into the program.