BREAKING: University of Minnesota study suggests coronavirus will be active for up to two years

USA Today looks at the information released by a University of Minnesota medical doctor who suggests coronavirus might be dangerous for up to two years.

States, territories and tribal health authorities should plan for the worst-case scenario,” warns the report out of the university’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, “including no vaccine availability or herd immunity.”

“Risk communication messaging from government officials should incorporate the concept that this pandemic will not be over soon and that people need to be prepared for possible periodic resurgences of disease,” the authors suggest.

The study team, headed by Dr. Kristine A. Moore, medical director at the University of Minnesota center, included pandemic experts from Harvard and Tulane universities.

2x UPDATED with photo: Kim Jong Un makes public appearance

Kim Jong Un, Public Domain Image

2nd UPDATE: 7:25 p.m. EDT (May 1) The latest story from Yonhap includes a photo of Kim.

1st UPDATE: 7:15 p.m. EDT (May 1): Yonhap’s updated story notes

“All the participants broke into thunderous cheers of ‘hurrah!’ extending the greatest glory to the Supreme Leader who has brought about a new change in the development of Juche-based fertilizer industry and has led the grand revolutionary advance for strengthening self-supporting economy to a victory with his outstanding leadership,” KCNA said.

ORIGINAL POST: Yonhap reports

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has made his firs public appearance after 20 days of absence, contradicting rumors about his health, state media showed on Saturday.

Kim attended a ceremony marking the completion of a fertilizer plant in Sunchon, South Phyongan Province, according to the media.

This May 1 is unlike any other in recent memory

May 1 is symbolic for workers and for college students.

For workers, May 1 is International Workers’ Day, a national holiday in many countries around the world.

It’s common for protests advocating for increases in pay and other improvements for workers to take place today. However, this year is different. Of course, the coronavirus pandemic is to blame. As the New York Times reports,

But in a world still largely under a pandemic lockdown, the annual demonstrations have had to be reimagined or, in some cases, halted altogether. At a time when workers of the world are bearing the brunt of the economic fallout of the widespread restrictions, some saw it as more important than ever to show their solidarity.

Watching Americans protest about stay-at-home orders while claiming their freedoms are being trampled upon is quite the contrast. Let’s leave it at that.

May 1 also is the unofficial Decision Day for high school seniors to lock in the college of their choice. This year? You guessed it: not happening. Inside Higher Ed notes,

More than 400 colleges have extended the deadline for admitted students to submit deposits to June 1 or later to give students and families more time to make their decision amid the uncertainty — financial and otherwise — caused by the coronavirus pandemic. In an Inside Higher Ed survey of college presidents, 39 percent said they had delayed admission deadlines in response to the pandemic.

A day that symbolizes current and future generations announcing their hopes for a better tomorrow is stifled because of a deadly pandemic. But optimism won’t be silenced.

A tip o’ the hat to workers and college students. Today and every day.