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BREAKING: NEW YORK TIMES: Coronavirus cases soar in New York City

The explosion of coronavirus cases we’re about to see in the United States will closely match what happened in other countries.

New York Times reports

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York provided new numbers on Wednesday that showed 2,382 people in the state had tested positive for the coronavirus, an increase of more than 800 since Tuesday. In New York City, 1,871 people had tested positive, compared with 814 on Tuesday.

Mr. Cuomo attributed much of the jump to an increase in testing. Of the 14,597 people to be tested so far, nearly 5,000 were tested on Tuesday.

Small

To prove how tough I am

I must make fun of someone else

The weak have no chance against my strength

The idiots cannot match my smarts

The losers can never win like I do

I stand so tall, so impressive, so amazing, so great

THE GUARDIAN: Russia spreading disinformation about coronavirus

The same ol’ boring storyline: Russia did it.

The Guardian has the latest example, noting

Pro-Kremlin media have been spreading disinformation about coronavirus with the aim of “aggravating” the public health crisis in the west, the European Union’s diplomatic service has concluded in a leaked report.

Can they find nothing else to write about?

(ICYMI) MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW: Life as we know it might be over because of coronavirus

The MIT Technology Review examines why coronavirus will alter life as we know it.

We all want things to go back to normal quickly. But what most of us have probably not yet realized—yet will soon—is that things won’t go back to normal after a few weeks, or even a few months. Some things never will.

And consider what the future MIGHT look like.

But one can imagine a world in which, to get on a flight, perhaps you’ll have to be signed up to a service that tracks your movements via your phone. The airline wouldn’t be able to see where you’d gone, but it would get an alert if you’d been close to known infected people or disease hot spots. There’d be similar requirements at the entrance to large venues, government buildings, or public transport hubs. There would be temperature scanners everywhere, and your workplace might demand you wear a monitor that tracks your temperature or other vital signs. Where nightclubs ask for proof of age, in future they might ask for proof of immunity—an identity card or some kind of digital verification via your phone, showing you’ve already recovered from or been vaccinated against the latest virus strains.

MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW: Life as we know it might be over because of coronavirus

The MIT Technology Review examines why coronavirus will alter life as we know it.

We all want things to go back to normal quickly. But what most of us have probably not yet realized—yet will soon—is that things won’t go back to normal after a few weeks, or even a few months. Some things never will.

And consider what the future MIGHT look like.

But one can imagine a world in which, to get on a flight, perhaps you’ll have to be signed up to a service that tracks your movements via your phone. The airline wouldn’t be able to see where you’d gone, but it would get an alert if you’d been close to known infected people or disease hot spots. There’d be similar requirements at the entrance to large venues, government buildings, or public transport hubs. There would be temperature scanners everywhere, and your workplace might demand you wear a monitor that tracks your temperature or other vital signs. Where nightclubs ask for proof of age, in future they might ask for proof of immunity—an identity card or some kind of digital verification via your phone, showing you’ve already recovered from or been vaccinated against the latest virus strains.