You took

Photo: Anthony Moretti, March 14, 2017

You took once

You demanded once

You did not hear the silence once

You took twice

You demanded twice

You did not hear the silence twice

There will not be a third time

Report: Russia planned cyberattack on Tokyo Olympics

If the latest media reports are to be believed, the Russian government planned a major cyberattack against the Tokyo Olympics, which were to take place last summer before being postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The question of Russia and cyber attacks is no longer if the country engages in such activities but how often it can be blamed.

The narrative is now quite familiar: A U.S. government agency (often supported by another Western ally) accuses Russia of a cyberattack. Names of the accused, who almost always are men, often are provided. Russia quickly denies the accusation. This kabuki theater play ends with all parties knowing that no matter what did — or didn’t happen — the accused will never be arrested because they live in Russia.

Monday’s announcement came on the same day the U.S. indicted six Russians amid accusations they tried to disrupt the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. It coincided with Russia making its own claim of being hacked.

Keep in mind that the U.S. is not innocent; it, too, carries out cyberattacks against its enemies. Iran often is the target, but China also has been in the U.S. cyber crosshairs.

Cyberattacks happen every single day. That statement is not meant to defend or criticize the action; the reality is they happen. But we’d be naive to suggest that liking the attack is determined solely by whether friend or foe is responsible for it.

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